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Updated: 16 hours 58 min ago

Winter’s Official Kickoff: US Open Beaver Creek, Santa + Hot Chocolate, Shaun White Appearance, Warren Miller Screening & much more

Wed, 11/30/2022 - 19:25

This weekend, Beaver Creeks kicks off winter with the US World Cup Birds of Prey Open. Not only will the first weekend of December feature epic ski racing, but also a plethora of activities including Shaun White autograph signing, Beers of Prey, Warren Miller Daymaker screening, fireworks and champagne. 

Hailed as the number one overall event to attend by athletes, coaches, and spectators alike, this is one weekend you will not want to miss. 

bcworldcup.com bcworldcup.com bcworldcup.com

For full details, tickets, and schedule please visit: https://bcworldcup.com

The Sitzmark Lodge in Vail, CO is sold!

Tue, 11/15/2022 - 20:33

Vail’s Sitzmark Lodge, owned and managed by the Fritch family since 1974, recently sold to a group of investors led by Steve Kisielica. Steve, a long time veteran of the lodging business, recently moved his family to the Vail Valley full time. When asked, Steve shared that he thought that the Sitzmark was undoubtedly “the best kept secret in Vail Village” although it was known for the extraordinary hospitality of the Fritz Family and for its unmatched location. With both ski slope views to the south and Gore Creek to the north, this boutique hotel, still now family owned and operated, offers an iconic location! We at Gateway Real Estate have been blessed with a corner office in the Sitzmark Lodge on Gore Creek and the International Bridge for 12 years! We are very excited for Steve Kisielica and his family and wish them the best their passion to put their mark on this legacy property.

For a tour of the Sitzmark building or any Vail Valley real estate needs please feel free to contact me, Suzi Apple, at 970-376-5417 or apple@gatewaytovail.com or visit our website gatewaytovail.com

Arrowhead at Vail’s New Exquisite Property for Sale

Sun, 11/13/2022 - 22:34

This breathtaking 9,080 square foot estate was constructed on the first homesite to be sold in Arrowhead at Vail. Backing up to a wooded backdrop of massive pines, this commanding acre+ lot is worthy of the legendary 7 bedroom, 7.5 bathroom home that was ultimately built on it. The international influence of the owners, Brian and Laura Woodford, is both handsome and elegant. A striking mix of British strength and Asian beauty describes the architectural style captured in the home. A 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom apartment with full kitchen, fireplace and separate entrance, originally built to house the owners pilots, gives this property great versatility. Elegant, rare and versatile this unique estate will not be available for long! For more information on this property or for a private tour please contact me at 970-376-5417 or apple@gatewaytovail.com

Vail Opening Day Guide

Wed, 11/09/2022 - 15:22

2022 Vail opens its lifts earlier than ever! Tomorrow Thursday 11/11 Vail rings the bell for opening day. It’s one of our favorite days of the year and brings in skiing and snowboarding enthusiasts from around the world. To make sure your opening day is epic, here are a few things to keep in mind:

  1. Be Prepared for Lines: lift lines are a given, but also factor in parking, rental shops, and restaurants. Making reservations ahead of time help ensure your day flows like the perfect S line.
  2. Reactivate or Print New Pass: make sure you have your pass ready to go or you will be forced to sit in one of the slowest lines in history – the ticket line. Just in case, bring valid photo ID and receipt of pass purchase to get pass reprinted if necessary.
  3. Variable Conditions: Vail does a lot to ensure the mountain is safe, but it is still early season. Be careful with brand new equipment – you’ll be getting the feel for it and rocks, branches, etc may be present. 
  4. Layer: temperatures have been fluctuating. Earlier this week was up to 60 degrees in the day and down below freezing in the evenings. Layer attire appropriately to be prepared for variable weather.
  5. Be Aware of Others: this is a day of excitement for all, but for most of us, its been months since we’ve been on the snow. Remember everyone is just warming up their ski legs, so stay aware and keep your distance from others. 
  6. Have a Plan if Roads Close: if you are traveling here from out of town, have a plan in case roads close. With increased traffic to hit the slopes comes an increased chances of accidents which may close the pass. Be prepared in case you need to spend the night close to the mountain.
  7. Stay Stoked! The runs may be short, the lines long, but at the end of the day just remember that you are skiing on a weekday on the earliest opening day ever – and that’s pretty awesome.

Ice Bar Returns To Vail Mountain

Fri, 11/04/2022 - 21:56

Vail Resorts has decided to bring back its famous Ice Bar that was created in the 1960s when the resort first opened! Thanks to Bill Whiteford, the original ice bar was created in February of 1965. This is very exciting news because the original ice bar only lasted for one season back when the resort first opened! Vail will be bringing back not one, but two ice bars this season to kick off its 60th-year anniversary!

The two ice bars will be built at Eagle’s Nest and Wildwood located on the top of the mountain! In addition to the ice bars, there will be plastic “igloos” with metal frames that guests can reserve ahead of time for use. Skiers and snowboarders alike will be able to enjoy a full bar and limited food menus. Vail is hoping to have the two bars up and running by December!

We look forward to seeing you on the mountain this season!

Holiday Like A Pro

Thu, 11/03/2022 - 02:46

I love this time of year for many reasons: fresh snow, a quieter village, and crisp mornings. Winter is on its way and while that means powder days are on the way, it also means that the holiday craziness if fast approaching. Over the weekend, I watched one of my favorite shows The Home Edit. If you haven’t watched, two women started this home organization business that has exploded into a Netflix sensation and organization empire. The whole process of getting a home in order can be overwhelming, but they breakdown mini-projects that can be done each day for month to turn a chaotic household into a gorgeous and fully functional home. 

For week number one, here are their easy to follow recommendations:

Day 1: Check Expiration Dates

The Home Edit Blog

No need to take everything out. Just grab a trash bag and start checking dates. Keep track of the expired items that should be replaced or never bought again. If you have bulk items in canisters, make sure to write the expiration date on the back, either with a label maker or a washable chalk marker, because no one likes a stale pasta night.

Day 2: Tackle a Drawer

The Home Edit Blog

Not two. Just one. We always say, “If you can manage a drawer, you can do so much more.” And it’s so true! Drawers are a manageable project that will give you a bite-sized win without feeling overwhelmed.

Use individual inserts in various sizes to contain your categories, testing multiple configurations to come up with the smartest solution for the space.

Day 3: Master the File Fold

The Home Edit Blog

File folding is so calming—it’s basically a cheap form of therapy. This technique turns stacks of clothing or linens upright so you can quickly identify what you have, and helps maximize drawer space when you really need it.

Step 1: Lay the shirt flat in front of you, with the front of the shirt facing down.

Step 2: Fold in the right sleeve

Step 3: Fold both sleeves to the middle of the shirt. Fold the sides of the shirt slightly, it should never go past where the hem (aka the neckline stitching) begins on either side

Step 4: Fold the shirt in half from the bottom hem

You’re done! The trick to knowing whether you folded it correctly is if the shirt stands up by itself with the folded side up. If your shirts need a little extra support, feel free to add some expandable dividers into your drawer.

Day 4: Edit Your Inbox

Start by purging anything you no longer need and unsubscribing to any newsletter or promotional content that is clogging up your inbox. Then set up folders for your general categories (Work, Family, Travel, Etc.) and use filters so emails go straight to the inbox they belong in. From there, you can also prioritize these emails into categories that signal action such as Reply or Waiting For Reply so you don’t miss anything.

Day 5: Try a Turntable

The Home Edit Blog

If there’s one thing we know to be true, it’s that we *love* a turntable. They work practically anywhere in the home and can be the perfect solution for even the trickiest of spaces! Think about something that is giving you trouble. Maybe it’s the fact that you can never access the cooking oils properly in your pantry. Maybe it’s that awkward corner in your bathroom cabinet where things get lost in the mix. Try a turntable and see what happens!

Day 6: Tame Your Cords

Every device seems to come with extra cables, adapters, and accessories. Chances are, you probably don’t need all of them, BUT IF YOU DO…wrap a cord tie around each individual cord, add a label to identify what they go, and store them in a designated drawer or bin.

Day 7: Swap Your Hangers

Wire and plastic hangers are the worst. Sorry if that offends anybody, but it’s true. If you’re looking for the easiest way to update your closet and maximize hanging room, invest in matching velvet or wooden hangers.

All tips provided by The Home Edit Blog at https://thehomeedit.com/blogs/the-blog/the-fresh-start-february-challenge-week-1

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What is Edwards, CO?

Wed, 10/26/2022 - 21:48

That is a great question! Jessica Flint, real estate reporter for the Mansion Section of the Wall Street Journal actually interviewed me last week, wanting my insight on what is so alluring about living down valley? Is it the stunning Lake Creek Valley with its endless ranches and iconic homes? Or is it Arrowhead offering phenomenal golf at Country Club of the Rockies, the Alpine Club and ski mountain access? Or is it the Singletree neighborhood, home to the Sonnenalp Golf Club and so many locals? Or is it the four Cordilleras, with four golf courses, three fitness centers and endless trails for hiking, biking or snow shoeing? Or is it the fun, bustling town itself with numerous shops and fabulous restaurants? Yes, yes and yes to all of the above! But the lower altitude combined with shorter Winters and longer Summer’s makes living here almost irresistible for many of us to resist!

Gilman: A True Ghost Town

Wed, 10/26/2022 - 18:35

Who doesn’t love a good ghost story during this spooky Halloween season? Here is Eagle County we have our very own infamous ghost town – Gilman. The rich history of this mining town tells a story of boom, bust, and a haunting legacy.

A Promising Beginning

Founded in 1886 during the Colorado Silver Boom, the town later became a center of lead and zinc mining in Colorado. The mining district became the richest and most successful in Eagle County. 

By late 1887, the fledgling town boasted a hotel, a boarding house, a general store, a billiard hall, a sampling room, a newspaper called the Gilman Enterprise, several saloons, and a population upwards of 1,000 people. Like many other mining camps, it also hosted several rowdies who might ride their horses into a saloon, shoot out the lights, and conduct acts of banditry and violence.

In 1899, Gilman was almost destroyed by a fire that took down the Iron Mask Hotel, the school, the shaft house of the Little Bell Mine, and much of the business district.

By 1900, some $8 million in silver, gold, and lead ore had been recovered on Battle Mountain. However, by this time, the area mines were no longer producing much silver and turned to mining zinc.

In 1905, The Eagle Milling and Mining Company reopened the Iron Mask Mine with a new emphasis on zinc production and installed a roaster and magnetic separator that separated the zinc minerals. In 1912, the New Jersey Zinc Company began buying up the claims and land on Battle Mountain, including the town of Gilman, and the days of independent miners came to an end.

Efficiency was an essential part of Gilman’s longstanding commercial success as a company town. The company began buying and tearing down all the old cabins and, by 1919, erected dozens of uniform houses placed in rows down the hill from the shaft house. With black tar paper roofs and gray paint, these utilitarian houses were well insulated and had electricity and hot water.

The company maintained total ownership of Gilman, including the housing, school building, post office property, and all of the town’s retail space. The company built a two-story clubhouse with a pool hall, basketball court, and library-lounge, that served as the hub for recreation. They also built a hospital, a general store, a dormitory, and a mess hall to accommodate 60 men.

The clubhouse often brought the whole community together for monthly dances, sing-a-longs, Hollywood movies, and holiday celebrations. Further entertainment was found during the winter when residents enjoyed sledding down the steep hillsides on cardboard, garbage can lids, coal shovels, and toboggans, sometimes to the base of Battle Mountain. Skiing was introduced to the community by Scandinavian workers in the 1920s, long before the nearby ski resorts were founded. In these early days, the skiers utilized plain wooden skis without fancy boots or bindings and made poles with broomsticks rammed through coffee can lids. The residents also enjoyed the unspoiled wilderness around Gilman for hunting, fishing, hiking, and camping.

Zinc remained the economic mainstay until 1931, when low zinc prices forced the company to switch to mining copper and silver ores. Amid the Great Depression, most industrial mining virtually ceased in Colorado, but unlike similar mechanized mines, the Eagle Mine never closed. Though the company did lay off many single employees and cut the hours and wages of remaining workers, comparatively speaking, the Eagle Mine was quite successful during this time, producing 85 percent of Colorado’s copper and 65 percent of its silver. In 1933, the company recalled many of Gilman’s laid-off workers.

But by the mid-1970s, most auto manufacturers had abandoned chrome in their vehicles, and the mine’s zinc reserves were nearly exhausted. A spike in gold and silver prices kept a much smaller operation going for a few years, but ultimately the Eagle Mine closed at the end of 1977. In December 1977, the operation laid off 154 miners after a two-week notice, with 16 remaining on the payroll. Afterward, some limited copper and silver production occurred, but that too soon ceased, and the pumps were deactivated, and the mine was allowed to flood.

In 1983, the town and its mines were sold to a Canon City businessman named Glen Miller, who planned to put the land to multiple uses, including converting mine tailings into fertilizer, creating new residential development, and the possibility of developing a ski resort. However, within a year, he sold the town to the Battle Mountain Corporation.

Disaster Strikes

Gilman became an official ghost town in the spring of 1985 when the Battle Mountain Corporation evicted its remaining residents, and the post office closed its doors forever.

After the closure of the mine and the abandonment of the town, a 235-acre area, which included eight million tons of mine waste, was designated a Superfund site by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Massive amounts of pollutants had been released into the ecosystem, which placed the site on the National Priorities List.

Interestingly, CBS Operations, Inc., who bought Viacom International, Inc., which owned the controlling shares of New Jersey Zinc Company, was deemed responsible for the site’s cleanup. Cleanup of the mine began in 1988 with the relocation of mine wastes and capping of the main tailings pile. According to the EPA, the network of mines included “an estimated 70 miles of underground mine tunnels”.

EPA Updates Status

In September 2021, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday issued the removal of part of the Eagle Mine Superfund site in Minturn from the National Priorities List (NPL). The deletion of Operable Unit 2 at the Eagle Mine Superfund site reflects the significant progress that has been made to secure the site and protect human health and the environment. Therefore, EPA and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) have determined that no further cleanup response is necessary at OU2 of the site. 

Despite the new designation, the future of Gilman is still unclear. “No Trespassing” signs hang on the closed gates, and more signs are posted warning trespassers of “Hidden and Visible Dangers” and the “Risk of Injury or Death.” However, in years past, many have ventured onto the property, despite the warnings. This is evidenced by the amount of graffiti on the buildings and photographs taken by trespassers. Inside the buildings, x-rays are strewn about the old hospital; mine records remain in the offices, furniture and appliances sit rusting and deteriorating in the houses, and a rusty swing set and a slide still sit in the old schoolyard. Mine buildings are filled with old equipment and abandoned vehicles.

Tour tickets are now available to view the mine so book ahead: https://erwc.org/event/eagle-mine-tour/. Do not attempt to view on your own, as trespassing is strictly forbidden and violators are routinely persecuted. 

Notice: No trespassing means no trespassing. The Eagle County Sheriff’s Department stepped in and now cites trespassers with a ticket and a fine. To help with the enforcement of the no-trespassing laws, the local Crime Stoppers organization rewards tipsters with as much as a $1,000 reward. 

Halloween Events

Wed, 10/19/2022 - 19:30

Best Places for Halloween Events

Looking for things to do in Eagle County this Halloween? Thankfully there are several family friendly events planned throughout the valley this season!

  • 10/26 
    • Eagle Ranch Village 5-7 pm: includes games, photos, DJ, thriller dance
  • 10/27
    • Gypsum Rec 5:30-7 pm: story time, costume contest, and drawing
  • 10/28
    • Kiddie Halloween Party at North Coast Originals 4-7:30 pm: paper jack o’lanterns, cookie decorating, dipped candied apples, adult beverages & snacks.
  • 10/29 & 10/30
    • Science Spooktacular at Walking Mountain Science Center in Avon 9 am – 12 pm
    • Learn about forensic science by dusting for prints, exploring with periscopes, decoding secret messages, and writing with invisible ink. Plus, Bravo! Vail Music Makers Haciendo Música students and staff will present a Spooky Concert, Spooky Forest Walk, and a Spooky Sounds Instrument Petting Zoo
  • 10/30 
    • Minturn Halloween neighborhood trick or treating 5:30-7:30 pm 
    • Most homes are decked out in full Halloween decorations, so its a great place for an authentic trick or treating experience. Please note that Minturn has limited sidewalk space, so strollers may be a hassle.
  • 10/31
    • Miller Ranch Edwards neighborhood trick or treating 4-7 pm
    • Vail Valley Trick or Treat Trot 2-5 pm 
      • Come and enjoy this safe trick or treating venue for kids of all ages. A wonderful Vail tradition. The Trick-or-Treat-Trot is Vail’s annual trick-or-treating event so little ones (and bigger ones) can run costume-clad through Vail and Lionshead Villages and collect candy from participating merchants.

This Colorado Community Offers High-Life Living With a Little Less Altitude

Mon, 10/17/2022 - 21:08

Edwards (81632) has some of the area’s priciest real estate—even pricier than Vail. An unincorporated Rocky Mountain community in Eagle County, Edwards has a locals’ vibe with a busy downtown along the Eagle River.

Vail’s tourism industry is the economic driver in Colorado’s Vail Valley, but Edwards, ZIP Code 81632 and about 15 miles west of Vail, has the area’s priciest residential real estate as ranked by median listing price, according to Realtor.com. It is bested only by Woody Creek and Snowmass, both in the same area as Aspen, and Telluride. An unincorporated Rocky Mountain community in Eagle County, Edwards has a locals’ vibe with a busy downtown along the Eagle River. Driving Edwards’s real-estate market up are Cordillera, a 7,000-acre gated community with more than 800 homesites, and Arrowhead Village, with access to Beaver Creek Resort. Both high-end developments have member clubs, golf courses and restaurants. 

Membership to have
Several Vail Valley private clubs such as the Vail Mountain Club, in Vail Village near Gondola One, or the Arrowhead Alpine Club, at the base of Beaver Creek Resort’s Arrow Bahn Express Lift, provide members with year round benefits, including a range of ski-in and ski-out amenities, from heated parking to ski-valet services to on-mountain dining, depending on the club. 

Advice for the Buyer
Compared with Vail, Edwards has a lower altitude (leading to better breathing and sleeping for many people), a warmer temperature and days with more sunlight for longer, says Suzi Apple, founder and owner of Gateway Real Estate in Vail Valley. “The combination makes Edwards so appealing,” she says. Ms. Apple also notes that Edwards has more neighborhood communities and schools to choose from, and world-class golfing, too.

11,246— Population of Edwards, according to census data. By comparison, Vail has 4,835 full-time residents, and about the same number of part-time residents. 

Via @WSJ. This week, The Wall Street Journal’s Mansion section is rolling out stories from our ski and mountain homes issue.

On the Market Luxury Vail Valley Property

Wed, 08/17/2022 - 01:35

Located in the highly sought after Vail Golf Course neighborhood at 1367 Vail Valley Drive, Vail. This 4 bedroom, 5.5 bath, 3,045 sqft home is stunning. The open, free flowing floor plan is perfect for all your family gatherings while the spacious great room with striking stone fireplace serves as the focal point of the room. A charming balcony is accessed by French doors from the great room, providing lovely views east for your sunrise enjoyment. See more here

Vail Valley Hikes: The Mountains are Callings

Mon, 08/15/2022 - 23:45

To locals and visitors alike, hiking is one of the most beloved activities throughout the Vail Valley. The beautiful simplicity of getting out in the natural environment brings joy to all ages, whether its watching deer prance through a flower field or plunging into a pristine alpine lake. The thrill of adventure, fresh mountain air, and delight in reaching the peak keeps us all coming back for more. Here are a few of our teams’ favorites:

Suzi’s Choice: Missouri Lakes

Known for its spectacular cascading lakes and gorgeous wildflower display, Missouri Lakes is sure to impress even the most seasoned hikers. During the climb, hikers pass alongside a massive avalanche debris field which is a true must-see in real life. For the fisherman in your group, encourage them to bring a pole for some prime alpine fishing. During the summer, do not forget your bug spray or sunscreen as some days are quite mosquito-y and sunny.

  • Important Notes:
    • Trail Details: 9.2 mile out-and-back trail with over 2,300 foot elevation gain. 
    • Trail Head Location: take Highway 24 out of Leadville over Tennessee Pass to FSR 703 (hairpin curve), then drive to Missouri Rd and follow until you reach Missouri Lakes Trailhead parking lot
    • Dogs must be leashed

Charice’s Choice: Beaver Lake Trail

A truly beloved trail where you may catch a moose sighting, the abundance of summer wildflowers, or the rich hues autumn foliage. This trail keeps us coming back for more season after season because you’ll never experience it the same way twice. Additionally, the trail begins in Beaver Creek village so you can truly customize your experience based upon your group’s ages, abilities, and experience-levels: 1) centennial chairlift offers either a lift to the top or a ride down once you reach the top; 2) you can choose between Beaver Lake Trail or Five Senses Trailhead; and 3) your group can pack a lunch for the trail or enjoy the one of the several restaurant options in Beaver Creek village. If you are inclined to take a swim, don’t forget to pack your swimsuit!

  • Important Notes
    • 6.3 mile out and back trail 
    • No parking at trailhead, Park at Beaver Creek structure
    • This trail can get crowded during the summer, so we recommend to plan this hike on a weekday if possible
    • Can also horseback ride up the trail
    • Dogs must be leashed

Miranda’s Choice: Booth Falls 

Entering into Eagle’s Nest Wilderness, this trail winds through untouched aspen groves forests, steep rocky peaks of the Gore Range, and panoramic views of Booth Falls. The trail follows the valley floors and emerges atop the falls where you can look back and see for miles and miles. This area is the homeland for the Big Horn Sheep and another beautiful trail to catch either the summer flowers or fall leaves, so don’t forget to bring your camera. We recommend planning on hiking this trail early morning since shaded areas are far and few between. 

  • Important Notes:
    • 4.2 out and back
    • No parking at trailhead – either Gore Creek parking lot, Redsand stone or Vail Village parking structure and take the bus. Car will be towed
    • Rated moderate in difficulty, well maintained trail